Author Archive: barton-turf123

Staithes

Today the principal staithe serving Barton Broad is at the end of Staithe Road in Barton Turf, where there are a parish and public moorings and Cox’s Boatyard. This is also the location of the Black Shed and Staithe House which was formerly the Hole in the Wall beerhouse.

An early photograph of Barton Staithe looking towards the broad. The Black Shed is on the left.

Another early photograph of Barton Staithe looking towards the village. Cox’s Boatyard is on the left, Staithe House and the Black Shed are on the right.

The First Edition Ordnance Survey Map dated 1838, shows four staithes around Barton Broad, but intriguingly the present Barton Turf Staithe is not one of them. However, this staithe is shown on

an 1809 pre-inclosure map where it is labeled The Common Staithe. Its omission from the Ordnance Survey map may be an oversight or indicate that this was based on an earlier survey.

The other four shown on the Ordnance Survey map were Wood End Staithe just over the parish boundary in Catfield, which still exists, another staithe on the eastern side of the broad near Wood Farm again close to the Barton Turf and Catfield parish boundary, one on the eastern side probably at Hall Dyke and one at Callow Green.

A highway diversion map of 1850 also shows Limekiln Staithe off Boat Dike (now Limekiln Dyke).

The staithe near Wood Farm was used by people from Barton bound for Great Yarmouth, as this account taken from John Yaxley’s A Jam Round Barton Turf describes:

Here, was one means of getting to Yarmouth.

By rowing across the broad, getting ashore at the head of this dyke, near the mill, taking the footpath through Wood End Farm and to Catfield Station on the M&GN railway thence to Beach Station, now the car and coach park at Great Yarmouth.

This was very convenient for those wishing to shop etc, and also for the local men of the village doing a fishing season from that port.  Returning home to this mill, the fishermen’s shouts would bring a boat out from Barton to ferry them home.

Sources: 83,84,91

Vicarage

The Vicarage at Barton Turf was built in 1884-5 and is located close to Barton Turf Parish Church.

White’s Directory, 1890, records:

A handsome new Vicarage House was erected near the church, 1884-5, at a cost of £1,600.

The Barton Church Terrier for 1955 records that it was sold on 19th July 1954 to Mrs. B M Sturgess for £1,850.

Vicarage